Woman's brain alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer’s Disease (Kunkle, 2019)

STUDY TITLE: Genetic meta-analysis of diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease identifies new risk loci and implicates Aβ, tau, immunity and lipid processing

SUMMARY: Identification of 5 novel genetic loci correlated to a person’s risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

DESCRIPTION: Alzheimer’s disease is a common cause of dementia, characterized by the degeneration of brain cells. Late-onset Alzheimer’s is the most typical form of the disease and typically results in the progressive impairment of cognitive abilities. Heredity is known to have a component in determining a person’s risk of developing this condition. By examining the genetic information of nearly 95,000 participants of European descent, this study identified 5 new variants that appear to correlate with an individual’s risk of developing the late-onset condition. Some of these variants are located near genes that may affect the accumulation of proteins that disrupt brain function. Other variants are in proximity of genes that are thought to be involved in the functioning of the immune system. Collectively, these variants explain an estimated 7% of the heritability for this condition.

DID YOU KNOW? Chronic stress can harm areas of the brain related to memory, and increase a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Relaxing activities such as breathing exercises, mediation, and yoga can help manage stress. [SOURCE]

SAMPLE RESULTS: Learn more about the Nebula Research Library.

Example of personalized results on Nebula

ALZHEIMER’S-ASSOCIATED VARIANTS: rs429358, rs6733839, rs3851179, rs4844610, rs9331896, rs7933202, rs3752246, rs75932628, rs73223431, rs3740688, rs11218343, rs9271058, rs7920721, rs9473117, rs10808026, rs12539172, rs17125924, rs10933431, rs138190086, rs593742, rs12881735, rs7185636, rs2830500, rs6024870

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:
Alzheimer’s Disease (Video)

WEEKLY UPDATE: October 17, 2019

Share this post
Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on print
Share on email
en_USEnglish